Are you covered checklist

Am I Covered?


Let’s face it. Mid-installation is no time to discover that your drill bits are missing or you somehow overlooked those unsightly holes in your walls. Fortunately, with some pre-planning and our handy checklists, you can take pro-active steps to make sure you have basic tools and materials before you’re headlong into your storage project.


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Storage Removal Tools

These are the tools and materials you'll most likely need to repair and update your storage space prior to installation.

Tool or Material

Have

Need To Get

Cordless Drill

Helpful Tip:

Use the reverse direction feature on a cordless drill to remove screws from an existing storage system.

Phillips Screwdriver

Helpful Tip:

The four-star point Phillips screwdriver can be used to loosen and remove shelf bracket screws and any Phillips screws that may be securing existing shelves to supporting braces. A #2 point screwdriver is most useful to have. It should fit a number of different sized screws.

Hammer

Helpful Tip:

Use the claw of your hammer to remove nail-mounted wall brackets. To avoid marring the wall, try slipping a piece of rag between the hammer head and your wall.

Spackling Compound

Helpful Tip:

When filling your wall holes with spackling compound, be sure to allow it to dry completely before you scrape the surface smooth with your wide putty knife. If you’re confronted with larger, deeper holes, bigger than your fist, it will require a more solid substance filler like an extra piece of sheetrock or blueboard.

Putty Knife

Helpful Tip:

Putty shrinks as it dries, so make sure you reapply and leave excess slightly above the wall to ensure the newly applied dries flush with the wall. You can also use your putty knife to pry or loosen shelf brackets that have been nailed in place.

Paintbrush

Helpful Tip:

When you load your paintbrush with paint, don’t scrape the excess off on the lid of the can. That paint will eventually dry, fall into the can and end up as lumps on your wall. To remove excess paint, just tap your brush a few times against the inside of the can.

Paint

Helpful Tip:

Secluded storage spaces are a great place to make use of that leftover paint you’ve been keeping in the basement or your garage. If you find a color to your liking, and there’s enough for your space, use it. But be careful not to shake it up. Open it up and remove the skin from the top before you begin mixing.

Step Stool

Helpful Tip:

Removal tasks should always be performed with a sturdy stance and a comfortable reach. A proper step stool provides the extra leverage you may need to pry and remove overhead shelving components safely.

Storage Installation Tools

Start your storage installation off right. Use some up-front time to gather these tools and materials. It's a short list, but it goes a long way toward making your installation experience just that much easier.

Tool or Material

Have

Need To Get

Pencil

Helpful Tip:

Keep a pencil handy to clearly mark locations where studs are found behind the wall and where hanging tracks and shelves will be installed.

Tape Measure

Helpful Tip:

Ensure that you are mounting support rails, shelves or other storage hardware at the appropriate suggested height for ease of use. Remember to measure twice (maybe even more) to avoid time-consuming adjustments.

Level

Helpful Tip:

Use a level to draw a line the length of each shelf along the wall and ensure your storage organizer, shelving and drawers are maintaining proper right angles. A level can help you get it done right the first time.

Stud Finder (suggested)

Helpful Tip:

Stud mounting ensures the strongest possible installation. Whenever possible, ClosetMaid recommends using studs to mount hardware to your wall. If you don’t have a stud finder you may be able to locate a stud by lightly tapping the wall with a hammer to pinpoint a dull (as opposed to hollow) sound.

Phillips Screwdriver

Helpful Tip:

The four-star point Phillips screwdriver gives you the ability to make fine adjustments on Phillips screws that secure hang track and standards to the wall. A #2 point screwdriver is most useful to have. It should fit a number of different sized screws.

Hammer

Helpful Tip:

Some tasks will actually require you to turn the hammer around so the flat end of the handle is facing the wall. Use the handle to gently push wall pins/anchors into place.

Cordless Drill and 1/4 Inch Bits

Helpful Tip:

A cordless power drill is an essential tool for drilling holes and driving screws. Your wall type will determine which bit should be used. Drywall, paneling, plywood and concrete will require you to drill a hole 1/4" around and 1" deep. Drywall bits are used for sheetrock or plasterboard. Concrete requires a masonry bit. Pay close attention to where you are drilling to avoid striking electrical wiring or plumbing fixtures.

Hacksaw

Helpful Tip:

Need help making cutting wire shelving to the proper length? Bring your measurements and shelving to a participating ClosetMaid retailer and ask a store associate to make the cut(s) for you.

Step Stool

Helpful Tip:

Overhead or high level shelves can really help to maximize your storage space, but their height can present an installation challenge. Step stools work well for enclosed storage spaces and provide the extra stability you’ll need to safely and successfully incorporate every last usable inch into your storage installation.